Session Description

2017 Plenary Descriptions Coming Soon!

Below are sessions from 2016

Tuesday, March 1, 2016 

 

Title: Lessons Learned and Expert Recommendations on How to Foster Brand Resilience During and After a Crisis
Speakers: John Deveney
11:15 AM – 12:00 Pm

The last 10 years in New Orleans have been a showcase in recovery and resilience unlike any other. Our city has become a universal success story of how a community can not only rebuild, but also transform in the wake of a disaster. Join John Deveney, a national leader in strategic marketing and crisis communication, as he explores what communities must do in order to anticipate change, reduce the impact of major events and come back from a devastating blow stronger than ever. In this presentation, John will highlight key members of the business community who have contributed to New Orleans’ resilience during times of crisis, examining their experiences and sharing their expert advice on what to do when a crucial situation hits your community. John is a top-rated presenter at conferences worldwide and recognized internationally for crisis and issue management. He served as a first responder and chief communication officer during hurricanes Katrina and Rita—from evacuation of the city to a military blockade and the aftermath — for the tourism industry, New Orleans CVB and the Louisiana Office of Tourism. John also led crisis response for the State of Louisiana during and following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Title: Application of the Disaster Resilience Scorecard in Europe, Asia, and the United States
Speakers: Dale Sands
11:15 AM – 12:00 PM

The trend toward continued urbanization, increased frequency of natural disasters, and large capital damage has put more focus on improving the resilience of the major metropolitan areas of the world. The Disaster Resilience Scorecard was developed by AECOM and IBM based upon the United Nation International Strategy for Disaster Risk Reductions’ (UNISDR) Ten Essentials for Disaster Risk Reduction. This Scorecard develops information necessary to evaluate preparedness and identify important areas of focus for resilience plan preparation. Since introduction of this tool in March, 2014 and release to the Public Domain, the Scorecard has been applied to numerous Cities in Asia, Europe and the Americas. This presentation will present a summary of results achieved from several applications of this scorecard and will briefly present lessons learned to further enhance the development of community resilience plans. This presentation will also highlight a new Scorecard developed specific to small- and mid-size businesses. This small- and mid-size business scorecard will be pilot tested at communities in New Orleans with preliminary results also presented.

 

Title: Using Technology to Leverage Donated Products for Public Good
Speakers: Lori Bertman; Shabab GrubergLee SilerJamison DayDal Herzog
11:15 AM – 12:00 PM

Good360 is a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) nonprofit that connects companies that have products with nonprofits that need them. Since 1983, Good360 has distributed more than $9 billion in donated goods around the world, helping its network of more than 48,000 prequalified nonprofits strengthen communities and improve the lives of millions of people in need. In 2015 alone, Good360 distributed more than 11,000 mattresses, 11,000 cartons of electronics and office items, 8,000 cartons of toys & crafts and 14,000 cartons of clothing, shoes and accessories to hundreds of thousands of people—and that’s just a fraction of what the organization does each year. Today, Good360 is expanding its impact around the world through new technology that makes giving more efficient and effective. Good360 is proud to partner with corporate donors such as Walmart, UPS, CVS Health Foundation, Nike, IKEA, Sears, Home Depot, Grainger, 3M, Mattel, Crayola, Gap, Inc., ANN INC., Williams-Sonoma and Hilton.

 

Title: National Disaster Resilience Competition Award Winners: On the Road to Implementation
Speakers: Jeff Hebert, Pat Forbes, Tina Quagliato, Adam Thiel, Janice Barnes
11:15 AM to 12:00 PM

View powerpoint presentation here! 

Following the most significant federal investment in resiliency ever made, recipient communities are now positioned to invest significant awards towards extraordinary, catalytic projects. Join NDRC award winners from Louisiana and across the country to learn more about next steps and implementation of these unprecedented funds.

Title: Building Water Resilience
Speakers: Mikko McFeely, Christian Kamrath
1:30 PM – 2:15 PM

Powerpoint presentation coming soon! 

Between April and June 2015, EPA carried out a regional resilience pilot project in Pensacola, FL. The goal of this project was to bring together utilities and emergency management professionals to focus mitigating the effects of disasters in their region. EPA used the lessons learned from this workshop series to produce an all-hazards guide for small and medium water and wastewater utilities. As emergency response continues to advance, mobile technology is used more because of its power and convenience. When disaster strikes, water and wastewater utilities must act quickly because a faster response means a faster recovery and greater overall resilience of the community. Water Utility Response On-The-Go is an innovative tool that allows water utility staff to use mobile devices to access critical information including weather and water hazard forecasts; contact information for local, state, and federal response partners, including laboratories; critical actions based on incident type; notes and damage assessments from the field; and forms for the Incident Command System (ICS).

 

 

Title: Safety as Human Right: Expectations for Government
Speakers: Alessia Clemente
1:30 PM – 2:15 PM

View powerpoint presentation here!

This talk will focus on the importance of working for resilience in capital and major cities of the developed world and especially in rural, less-developed areas of the world. The widespread belief that safety from the consequences of natural disasters is a right has led to a very strong increase in people’s expectations from governments.  That is one of the factors that has led to the establishment or optimization of civil protection systems in every country in which Ms Clemente is working within the Italian Government since 2003.

The enemy is the time between a disaster and the prediction, the decision for immediate prevention, the moment in which concrete rescue work is set.  Ms Clemente believes that the lesson one learns from working in civil protection on a daily basis can be of immense help also in defining a consistent and effective way of addressing the changes in the perception of disasters that are causing phenomena to shift away from areas in the world which have become very familiar to them towards other areas where those phenomena have been unknown hitherto. Each of us lives in risk conditions that we perceive as normal, without paying any special attention to the risk, because the ever-present risk is part of our habits; it is part of local culture.  Danger comes from three factors:  a person’s unfamiliarity with the area in which he or she lives and with its “risk profile” — people’s mobility has increased exponentially over the past 100 years, and millions of people now live in places in which they were not born; the difficulty in finding effective, economically sustainable and culturally acceptable responses to changes in the risk level with which a person is familiar; and the perception of risk as something “distant”, which in many people’s view justifies the priority afforded to other criteria for the assessment and grading of choices and decisions.

 

Title: What is a Resilience Academy and Why Does Your Community Need One
Speakers:
Janice Barnes, Sam Carter, Jason Hellendrung, Robin Edgeworth, Tina-Marie Quagliato
1:30 PM – 2:15 PM

Sam Carter, Associate Director of Resilience at The Rockefeller Foundation, will lead a discussion amongst jurisdictions from the National Disaster Resilience Competition, and subject matter experts who participated in the NDRC Resilience Academies.  This panel will provide an overview of the concept of the Resilience Academy, then each panelist will discuss their experience participating in the academy.  The purpose of this session is to demonstrate the value of the Resilience Academy for teaching resilience and informing the development of resilience projects and programs.

 

Title: From Disaster to Dessert: How Markets, Restaurants and Kiosks Energize Hope and Health
Speakers: 
Richard McCarthySandy NguyenOctavio Mantilla
1:30 PM – 2:15 PM

More info coming soon.

Title: Baby Boomers, Resilience, and Emergency Management
Speakers: Carolyn BluhmDee Grimm, Linda Mclver
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

View powerpoint presentation here! 

Disasters can adversely affect all members of the community, but we have learned from the recent past that individuals with disabilities, medical needs, and functional needs have traditionally been underserved in disasters and are often the most adversely affected. When thinking about aging and disabled populations, how do we manage demographics when thinking about building resilience, evacuation, and disaster preparedness? What are the communications strategies that work during an emergency response for the Baby Boomer and older age brackets? As we see an increase in technology allowing more individuals to live at home with significant medical conditions, and as the population continues to age and live longer with chronic medical conditions, we face the reality that we must be better prepared to integrate these vulnerable populations into the emergency management planning process. This interactive, moderated session will explore considerations for planning with these groups in mind, case studies and national best practices for designing emergency plans that are inclusive of aging and vulnerable groups, as well as ensuring communities maintain adequate sheltering capabilities that will adequately serve older adults and those receiving at-home healthcare.

 

 

Title: Driving Innovation in Crisis Management from the U.S. to the E.U.
Speakers: Richard Serino, Dara Dotz
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Crisis management and societal resilience capabilities are regularly challenged and constantly need to evolve to cope with new trends, such as emerging natural and man-made hazards, and the continuing connectivity of citizens. A range of innovations will be detailed such as FEMA Corps, a service model that has strengthened the nations disaster response capacity and modernized government operations to improve performance across sectors; as well as new technologies like 3-D printing that can transform emergency response by providing on-demand production of critical equipment or supplies.

 

 

Title: Benefit Cost Analysis 101: Making Your Case for Investing in Resilience
Speakers:
 Kaye MathenyJamie Torres SpringerKevin BushDavid Lessinger, Carly Foster
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

With strong evidence that the paradigms around federal funds are shifting, now is the moment to consider the true returns on investments in community housing, infrastructure and development.  Calculating the costs of a project and quantifying the scope and scale of project benefits can be a daunting task: this session will break down the methodologies around a BCA and illustrate the steps towards successfully calibrating resiliency projects.

 

 

Title: Resilient Infrastructure
Speakers: 
Adam ThielJosh Sawislak, Moderator – Amy Armstrong, Robert D. Rivers
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

 View powerpoint presentation here!

Innovative infrastructure policies and practices are contributing to increased resilience in cities and communities around the country. From incentivizing private investment, to new and progressive zoning and regulations, to creative approaches for utilizing capital budgets, a paradigm shift is underway in local and state municipalities, as well as within the private sector. Specifically, learn about initiatives designed to generate power, build social resilience, and enhance water management and transportation.

 

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 

 

Title: From Resiliency Planning to Implementation – Navigating the Obstacles  
Speakers: 
Bry SarteDavid WaggonnerMatthijs Bouw
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Drawing from our panel of global experts, our session will explore the emerging frontier of innovations in urban design and urban systems related to climate risk. Starting with national and international examples, we will describe policy frameworks and specific implementation projects that are changing coastal cities in the United States, Asia and Europe. Our panel will then move to the Mississippi Delta, and New Orleans in particular, to look at citywide planning that incorporates the concept of “Living with Water” and how it is now shaping implementation projects embedded in the city fabric.

 

Title: The Power of Data: Driving Recovery and Building Resilience
Speakers: 
Allison PlyerMaria Olmedo- MalagonNihal Shrinath, Christopher Reade
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

In the post-disaster information void, timely and reliable data are vital to the efficient allocation of resources, rebuilding of infrastructure, and development of effective policies.  Disasters tend to accelerate pre-disaster trends, but in certain cases, policy and business decisions can break the pattern as well as inform phases within the disaster response cycle: Emergency Response to Recovery to Resilience Planning. Without evidence and data to inform these decisions, it is highly unlikely that this pattern is indeed broken. In conjunction with the Data Center, the US Census Bureau will present case studies of how key Census data sets and analysis tools have been used to support emergency management — particularly highlighting OnTheMap for Emergency Management.  In addition to the immediate, post-disaster response data and tools, the New Orleans-based Data Center will describe the publication of The New Orleans Index series to illustrate how Census and other data was used to influence policy and decision making to support recovery in the years following Katrina —leading to institutionalized resiliency across various sectors and issue areas.  Finally, we will end by discussing how populations are already making decisions about relocations and return following severe weather events, and what sort of data is available to track and anticipate these kinds of populations shifts.

 

Title: Improving Decision Making for Flood Resilience
Speakers: 
Dan Cotter, John Miri, Michael Dossett, Gregg Sheiowitz
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

View powerpoint presentation here!

Mr. Cotter will lead a workshop that will identify challenges and programs and potential solutions to improving disaster resiliency. For example floods of all kinds represent a leading cause of fatalities and economic losses in the United States – and the world from natural disasters. Based on data from the National Weather Service, floods in the United States have resulted in an average over the last 30 years of 82 fatalities and $7.96 Billion in damages per year. DHS Science & Technology is working with FEMA and State and Local jurisdictions on a “Flood Apex” program to develop methods for improving flood resiliency. This multi-year program includes developing, testing and transitioning into operational use technologies and scientific based solutions that will improve decision making and reduce future flood fatalities and economic damages. The workshop will feature an overview of the key challenges and some initiatives designed to address them including: global / private sector approaches towards measurement based risk management and mitigation; a discussion of a Stated based technology to effectively document state and local mitigation needs and an effort to develop a “smart alert” system to develop sensor driven geo-precise alerts for the public.

 

 

Title: Lessons Learned from Paris
Speakers: 
Christian Sommade
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

From the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, this session will cover lessons learned from first responders and the entire crisis management system, identification of gaps that may exist in communication and technology, the challenges with information sharing in the EU, how social media can be used effectively and how other countries and communities may better prepare themselves for this type of event.

 

Title: Roadmap to Get from Disaster Recovery to Resilience
Speakers: 
Robin Keegan, Ted Guillot, Tennille Parker & Pat Forbes, Charlie Cook
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

This session will address the challenges of assessing damages, assigning monetary values, and ensuring ROI for long-term community benefit.  In many instances, recovery practices are guided by rebuilding what was lost or damaged, without questioning the value of these investments.  The session will examine tools and processes that start with measuring community conditions pre- and post-incident, to offer communities the ability to develop a recovery plan that starts with an understanding social and economic vulnerabilities to better prioritize long-term recovery investments that result in truly resilient communities. Only by imparting a holistic analysis of the recovery work needed and the long term threats and benefits to a community in the aftermath of a disaster can true resiliency—and higher monetary investment—be achieved.

 

 

Title:  Creating Equitable Opportunity while Rebuilding from Disaster
Speakers:
 Tyson Hackenberg & Mark Goodson, Michele Moore
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

As resiliency continues to get national recognition, the strongest corporate business models are forced to be designed with flexibility to respond to evolving opportunities. In this session, CB&I will highlight work underway for the New York City Housing Authority and the significant role job programs can play for Low to Moderate Income employment opportunities. More importantly, New York City officials will showcase examples of bold transformations to ensure lessons learned from disasters are applied to an active $3.2 billion dollar Hurricane Sandy Recovery initiative, creating a new and equitable way of doing business.

 

Title: Engaging Youth in Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience
Speakers: Akiko OtaniMinh Nguyen, Moderator: Eve Troeh
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

View powerpoint presentation here! 

In the Philippines, youth between the ages of 10 and 30-years comprise almost 50 percent of the population.  Unfortunately, the skills and abilities of youth are not fully maximized in disaster risk reduction and resilience.  If children and youth are taught disaster preparedness and given an active voice in building community resilience, they will bring change in society as future keepers of villages.

Advancing the capacity of young people in disaster risk reduction work is essential.  Strengthening the capacities in engaging with the Local Government Unit (LGU) is imperative in attaining an empowered young people.  R3ADY Asia-Pacific in collaboration with the Central Visayas Network of NGOS is partnering to increase the knowledge and skills of youth in community-based disaster risk reduction and management; to change the behavior of the community by strengthening youth engagement with Local Government Units in participatory implementation of the Disaster Risk Reduction Management plan, contingency planning, and other related activities; and will set up and equip a youth disaster risk reduction organization to facilitate disaster risk reduction management and climate change adaptation learning exchange and advocacy within the community during peace times, coordinate their actions, and mobilize resources for humanitarian response during and after a disaster.

 

Title: Integrating Culturally Appropriate Support into Disaster Recovery
Speakers: Jeremy StoneDanielle Butsick, Sandy Nguyen
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

People who have the fewest resources often suffer the most from a natural disaster.  Disasters disproportionately impact low-income residents, communities of color, people with disabilities, immigrants and refugees, and other groups who frequently struggle to obtain sufficient resources to meet their daily needs. These groups frequently experience difficultly accessing government assistance and services, and have limited capacity to participate during pre- and post-disaster planning processes. This session focuses on the integration of these communities into all resilience-building activities, from pre-disaster mitigation planning to economic recovery, with special attention focused on issues related to homelessness in planning for and recovering from disasters.  Participants will be encouraged to share best practices for inclusive engagement, and methods for providing culturally appropriate support.

 

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Title: Changing Course: Bold Solutions for Coastal Restoration
Speakers:
Steve Cochran , Brian Lezina
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Changing Course is a design competition organized to help develop long-term solutions to Louisiana’s coastal challenge – in the face of rising seas and sinking land that threaten its very future.  The winning ideas from three winning teams provide visions and a real basis for discussion about Louisiana’s future – its coast, its economy and its people. Come join that discussion and get your own sense of how long term resilience is being developed here in Louisiana.

 

Title: Intersection of Resiliency and Flood Risk Management
Speakers: Roy Wright
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

View powerpoint presentation here!

This session will discuss overarching resilience and flood risk management objectives including those that involve multiple sector coordination including other federal agencies, state and local governments, private non-profit, academia, and interested stakeholders of flood loss reduction. The discussion will include FEMA’s efforts to include community resilience in FEMA programs, development of resilience indicators, participation with the other federal agencies and the efforts of the Federal government to identify, manage, mitigate and communicate risk.

 

 

Title: The Garden State Approach: Improving Resiliency in Secaucus, New Jersey
Speakers: Rodric Bowman
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Following Superstorm Sandy, the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security & Preparedness (OHSP), the Governor’s Office of Intergovernmental Affairs (IGA) and other partners conducted a series of after action meetings with communities affected by the storm. These sessions allowed communities to share their experiences during and after the storm—experiences which OHSP, along with the Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, used in the creation of the Strategic Community Resiliency Plan (SCRP) program. This session presents the findings of this particular case study, and specifically how this planning process formed a foundation for resiliency strategies in Secaucus related to identified gaps and vulnerabilities.

 

 

Title: Adaptation Down Under: the Case of South East Queensland, Australia
Speakers: Dr. Marcello Sano, Jonathan Hird, Gillian Millar
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

View powerpoint presentation here! 

In Australia, South East Queensland’s low lying and densely populated areas have been identified by the IPCC as a hotspot for climatic risks in the future. In response to this risk, government has promoted numerous initiatives to better understand the risks to coastal communities and ecosystems and to promote integrated approaches for adaptation. The identification of vulnerability hotspots was carried out by combining information on inundation levels with the sensitivity of the community, infrastructure and the economy. This information was critical to work with local communities across the region in identifying possible adaptation options and to have a better understanding of their capacity to adapt in the future. Scenario planning and systems thinking techniques allowed us to identify these options, which were consequently used as a base to create detailed guidelines for the identification of possible solutions for local problems. In our experience we learned how to explore adaptation options and adaptive capacity to climate risks in close collaboration with government and communities and how to translate the results of engagement processes into practical advice and solutions at the local scale. We believe that our experience can provide tools and approaches to increase coastal resilience in the Mississippi Delta, where sparsely distributed settlements and climatic risks call for a paradigm shift to create the conditions for a thriving economy, resilient communities and healthy ecosystems in the future.